commentary, fun!

a new way of teaching prepositions

Old Spice came out with a commercial that went viral a few months back, which most of you have probably already seen.  But just in case you haven’t…

Recently, there emerged a take on it from an unlikely group, which doesn’t really require much of an introduction.  Simply – enjoy!!

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fun!

whoops

Jon Seale recently charged a slice of pizza and a Coke to his Visa card. The amount he saw on his online statement: $23,148,855,308,184,500.

The global gross domestic product is, by contrast, estimated at between a paltry $60 trillion and $70 trillion.

The North Texas man tells Robert Siegel that after he quit laughing, he called the bank.

“The girl that answered the phone actually kind of choked when she saw the number on her screen,” Seale says. “They have assured me they will take care of that.”

Seale was not the only person who experienced the glitch. It turns out that a small number of people, all using their Visa cards, were charged the same amount.

“My son made the comment that maybe with this amount of money we could afford to get season tickets to the Yankees,” Seale says. “I told him for this amount of money, we could buy the Yankees.”

(via All Things Considered)

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fun!

pie is the new cupcake

“It’s pie time that cupcakes moved on. What this country needs is a change of dessert attitude. Where cupcakes were individualized, pie is communal; where cupcakes were neat, pie is sloppy, where cupcakes were precious, pie is luscious; where cupcakes were frosted, pie is filled; where cupcakes were a business model, pie is a lifestyle. Cupcakes are over. Pie is now.”

– David Karp, LimeDuck

(via @wbur)

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commentary, fun!

whimsical utility

This is a relentless age we’re living in, a time when innovative solutions — or any solutions, for that matter — to our seemingly infinite problems seem in short supply.

So how do we come up with new ideas? How do we learn to think outside of normal parameters? Are the processes in place for doing so flawed? Do we rely too much on computer models? On consultants? On big-idea gurus lauding the merits of tribes and crowds or of starfish and spiders? On Twitter?

At the risk of sounding like a big-idea guru myself, I can’t help thinking that we’re all so mired in it that we’ve forgotten how to get out of it — how to daydream, invent, engage with the absurd.

Allison Arieff of NYT’s By Design blog in a recent piece on Steven M. Johnson, who she describes as an “inventor/author/cartoonist/former urban planner,” whose designs tend “toward the nodes where social issues intersect with design and urban planning issues.”  They’re ideas that are absurd, but delightfully so, and in the way that makes you quietly think, “Now why didn’t I think of that?”

Below, a few of his designs.

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